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Common Name: Great Blue Lobelia

Scientific Name: Lobelia siphilitica

 

General Description: Great blue lobelia is a close relative of cardinal flower and has many similar characteristics.  It is a clump-forming perennial that reaches 2-3 feet in height and has long, terminal flower spikes.  The stunning blue flowers appear in the latter half of summer to provide both color and nectar when many other flowers are spent.

Habitat: Great blue lobelia is commonly found in moist open woods, marshes, and along streams.  It is not fussy about sun; but it requires moist conditions and prefers rich soils.

Additional information: Great blue lobelia attracts a variety of insect pollinators as well as hummingbirds.  As with cardinal flower, it is best to plant great blue lobelia in part to full shade to minimize supplemental watering. This plant will spread slowly from the mother plant and can also provide “volunteer” seedlings; but it is not an aggressively spreading plant.  Great blue lobelia has been used for a variety of medicinal purposes – one of which led to its unsettling species name.

You are welcome to visit the Native Plant of the Week 

at 4020 Dunston Avenue.  

The featured plant is in the front yard and will be marked.

 

RCC FLYER 08 20 INVASIVE REMOVAL

REGISTER AND GET DIRECTIONS HERE

Common Name: Cardinal Flower

Scientific Name: Lobelia cardinalis

 

General Description: Clump-forming perennial that reaches 3-5 feet in height.  Stunning red flowers form along a terminal spike that is 8-12 inches long.  Dark green leaves provide the perfect backdrop to show off these beautiful flowers.

Habitat: Cardinal flower is commonly found near streams, ponds, and ditches because it absolutely requires moist to wet soil.  Cardinal flower can tolerate full shade to full sun.

Additional information: Cardinal flower is a magnet for hummingbirds.  The nectar in the long tubular flowers is not accessible to most pollinators; but readily available to hummingbirds which will visit the plants repeatedly every day the flowers are in bloom.  Cardinal flower can form dense colonies over time; but it is not an aggressive spreader.  In Richmond, it is best to plant cardinal flower in part to full shade to minimize supplemental watering. This is an ideal plant for that shady area with poor drainage or along a tree line.

You are welcome to visit the Native Plant of the Week 

at 4020 Dunston Avenue.  

The featured plant will be in the front yard 

and will be marked.

Common Name: Eastern Beebalm, Wild Bergamot, Horsemint

Photographer: Cressler, Alan

Photographer: Cressler, Alan

Scientific Name: Monarda fistulosa

General Description: Clump-forming perennial that reaches 2-3 feet in height.  Distinctive pink – purple flowers form at the top of square stems.  Green leaves often tinged with dark red or gray hues.

Habitat: Eastern beebalm grows best in full sun and well-drained, moist soils.  It is found naturally in meadows and thickets.

Additional information: Eastern beebalm is a member of the mint family and can spread quite aggressively by rhizomes. The beebalm in the picture were derived from just two plants that have been in the ground for 3 years.  For best results in Richmond with minimal maintenance, amend clay soils with organic matter for better drainage; add mulch to conserve water; and plant in an area with partial shade and room to grow.  Then sit back and enjoy the comings and goings of hummingbirds, butterflies, and bees.  This species of beebalm has a very wide geographic range that includes most of North America.  When purchasing seeds or plants, try to find a source that can confirm they were obtained from this vicinity so they will be adapted to the weather conditions of the Richmond area.

You are welcome to visit the Native Plant of the Week at 4020 Dunston Avenue.  The featured plant will be in the front yard and will be marked.

Photographer: Wasowski, Sally and Andy

Photographer: Wasowski, Sally and Andy

 

1.  Learn why we oppose the stream restoration for Reedy Creek…
2.  Pick up a sign for your yard at 4020 Dunston Ave.  67686c3c-6bff-458b-b63c-594db3704a6f
  • Sunday, June 26 from 3:00 – 5:00 pm
  • Monday, June 27 from 5:30 – 7:00 pm
  • Tuesday, June 28 from 5:30 – 7:00 pm

A donation small will help us cover cost.

Join us for a walk through the woods and down to the creek where we will discuss urban watershed issues and the proposed stream restoration.  The walk will last about an hour, perhaps a little more.  

 – Wed. June 29 at 6:00 pmReedy Creek after a rain
 – Sat. July 2 at 9:00 am

Meet at the end of Northrop Street off of Roanoke.    There is poison ivy at some points along the path – wear closed toed shoes and long pants.

Please read through the “Stop the Stream Restoration” tab to learn all of the background information.

Please let us know it you are interested in coming…

 

Questions?  Email us at reedycreekcoalition@gmail.com.

Thank you!

Common Name: Common Milkweed   Scientific Name: Asclepias syriaca

General Description: Perennial plant that reaches 3-5 feet in height; erect stem with large oval leaves that provide contrasting form to many other native perennials.  Pink flower clusters give way to pods that burst open and release brown seeds attached to silken fibers that aid with wind dispersal.

Habitat: Common milkweed can adapt to a variety of soils from rocky to sandy to clay.  However, it requires nearly full sun to thrive and prefers moist, well-drained conditions.  Common milkweed is found in disturbed areas and can spread aggressively via underground shoots if competition is limited.

Additional information: Common milkweed is a very valuable plant for wildlife.  It is a host plant for monarch caterpillars and the flowers attract a wide variety of pollinators.  The tough fibrous stems were harvested by Native Americans to make rope and nets.  Although mildly toxic uncooked, common milkweed (like pokeweed) can be eaten as a vegetable if prepared and cooked properly.

MILKWEED SEED, PLANT OF THE MONTH

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center http://www.wildflower.org/explore.php


MILKWEED, BILLS YARD

 

You are welcome to visit the

Native Plant of the Week

at 4020 Dunston Avenue.

The featured plant will be in the front yard

and will be marked.  

 

COMMON MILKWEED

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center http://www.wildflower.org/explore.php

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