How do I incorporate native plants into my yard?

We recently received an inquiry with this very question. It’s a great question, but we could not provide an easy answer without knowing much more. What do you have now? Sun or shade, how much space, soil conditions, long term goals? There are so many things to consider! If you are wondering the same thing we have the perfect book for you in our lending library…

This book includes chapters on lawns, trees, food, ecosystems, soil and much more in an easy to read format.  You can pick and choose which sections you feel the need to read.  Check it out at our website    https://reedycreekcoalition.org/good-reads-for-the-watershed/

It is also available as a book or e-book at the Richmond Public Library. 

 

Help Protect Crooked Branch Ravine Park

Habitat restoration is the process of assisting the recovery of an ecosystem that has been degraded, damaged, or destroyed.  In the case of Crooked Branch Ravine and other parks in our city, the problem is non-native invasive plant species that aggressively displace native plant species.  Non-native species simply cannot provide the support needed for the insects, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals who live there.

Please join us for as we work to return this little park to a more natural state by removing English ivy, Japanese honeysuckle, privet and other non-native invasive plants.  We will also cut the ivy at the base of trees.

  • Saturday,  February, 5 from 1 – 3 p.m.
  • If you can’t stay the entire time, that is fine.  Every little bit helps.
  • Bring gloves, hand clippers, loppers & a small saw if you can.    An old screwdriver is sometimes helpful for prying vines away from the tree so they are easier to cut.
  • We will meet in the cul de sac at the end of Northrop Street.

Questions?  Let us know.   https://reedycreekcoalition.org/contact-us/

Map to meeting site

drawing, robin

Treecology

Teachers, Parents, Kids!

Check out the newest addition to the Reedy Creek Library. This book is loaded with information about trees, forests and the critters that depend on them AND projects for the young naturalist.

A healthy tree canopy is the very best way to protect our streams and improve water quality.

Borrow the book using this link. https://reedycreekcoalition.org/good-reads-for-the-watershed/

Planning Your Landscape for Pollinators and Other Creatures

As the leaves fall and the last of the flowers are making seed many of us start planning next years garden in our minds. What shall we keep? What should be removed? Are there plants I could add that would benefit pollinators and others? These are very good questions and now is the perfect time to start planning! With that in mind, consider checking out this book from our lending library. (Please note that some plant species mentioned in the book may not be native to our area.)

Published to rave reviews in 1993, Noah’s Garden shows us how our landscape style of neat yards and gardens has devastated suburban ecology, wiping out entire communities of plants and animals by stripping bare their habitats and destroying their food supplies. When Stein realized what her intensive efforts at making a traditional garden had done, she set out to “ungarden.” Her book interweaves an account of her efforts with an explanation of the ecology of gardens. Noah’s Garden has become the bible of the new environmental gardening movement, and the author is one of its most popular spokespersons.

To borrow a book from Reedy Creek coalition simply enter the name of the book at this link.  https://reedycreekcoalition.org/contact-us/ 

 Please allow a day or two for a response which will come to your e-mail. 

.

Help Protect Crooked Branch Ravine Park

Please join us for as we work to return this little park to a more natural state by removing English ivy, Japanese honeysuckle, privet and other non-native invasive plants.  We will also cut the ivy at the base of trees. Birds eat the fruit and spead the seed for these plants, so this will also prevent the spread of these plants to parks and perhaps even your yard.

We would really appreciate your help.

Saturday morning, November 20 from 10:00 – 12:00

  • If you can only stay an hour, that’s OK. Every hour counts.
  • Bring gloves, hand clippers, loppers & a small saw if you can.    An old screwdriver is sometimes helpful for prying vines away from the tree so they are easier to cut.
  • Bring your own water bottle.
  • We will meet in the cul de sac at the end of Northrop Street.

Map to meeting site

drawing, robin

The Gift

Reedy Creek Coalition would like to share this book with our community. Yes, it’s a picture book, but we think it is appropriate for people of all ages and a wonderful opportunity for families to read together. Even better, the author and illustrator live right here in Richmond.

To borrow a book from Reedy Creek coalition simply enter the name of the book at this link.  https://reedycreekcoalition.org/contact-us/ 

Please allow a day or two for a response which will come to your e-mail. Visit our website for a list of other books we have in our lending library.

Introducing: Good Reads for the Watershed

Reedy Creek Coalition now has a small collection of books to share with you. Of the many excellent books about environmental care these are some of our favorites. Some are practical, others inspirational, a few specifically about watersheds. All provide information that could lead us to better care for our community. The majority of the books we offer are not available at the public library either because they not available from the vendors the library uses or are out of print.

This is how it works…

  • Request a book using the link below.
  • You will receive an e-mail that will include where to pick up the book.
  • Return the book when you are done, preferably within 3 weeks.

The link below also has a list of books available from the Richmond Public Library that we recommend.

GOOD READS FOR THE WATERSHED

Help Protect Crooked Branch Ravine Park

Please join us for as we work to return this little park to a more natural state by removing English ivy, Japanese honeysuckle, privet and other non-native invasive plants.  We will also cut the ivy at the base of trees. Birds eat the fruit and spead the seed for these plants, so this will also prevent the spread of these plants to parks and perhaps even your yard.

  • Sunday,  October 24 from 1 – 3 p.m.
  • If you can only stay an hour, that’s OK. Every hour counts.
  • Bring gloves, hand clippers, loppers & a small saw if you can.    An old screwdriver is sometimes helpful for prying vines away from the tree so they are easier to cut.
  • Bring your own water bottle.
  • We will meet in the cul de sac at the end of Northrop Street.

Map to meeting site

drawing, robin