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This is why Reedy Creek Coalition supports the use of native species….

http://www.bringingnaturehome.net/gardening-for-life.html

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Reedy Creek kids (and maybe even their parents) may be interested in an event at Bryan Park.  This is from the Friends of Bryan Park website…

“Water quality is an important matter; not just for fish and ducks . . . . everyone needs access to clean, safe water. Learn how to diagnose the health of Bryan Park’s streams by sampling and identifying aquatic macro-invertebrates.  Meet at the Nature Center from 2-3:30 pm.”

Inline image 1

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Reedy Creek and a small tributary, Crooked Branch, flow through Crooked Branch Ravine Park.  This small, passive park is home to many native trees, shrubs, and perennials that could be lost to advancing invasive plant species, particularly English ivy and privet.  Reedy Creek Coalition members are planning to have a workday once each month to remove invasive species.  Our efforts will focus on 1) removing ivy from trees and other plants that are significant sources of seed and 2) monitoring and removing small patches of non-native plants and seedlings from an area that is not yet severely impacted.

  • Please consider joining us on Sunday, May 14 from 1-3 p.m.
  • We will meet at the end of Northrop Street where there is a path into the park.
  • Bring gloves, pruners, and, if you have one, a small saw for cutting large ivy vines.

pawpaw canopyCome work with us under the beautiful oak, hickory, maple, sassafras, holly, beech, black gum, sweet gum canopy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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April Meeting

The April Reedy Creek Coalition meeting will be on Wednesday, April 12 at 6:30 p.m. at the Westover Hills Public Library and should be very interesting…
Four seniors from the University of Richmond will present their case study concerning the recent Reedy Creek stream restoration project which focused on how the city of Richmond manages environmental issues. The study has three main components:
  • The policy section is an overview of the project’s main stakeholders and each stakeholder’s role/influence on the outcome(s) of the project.
  • The GIS section is a technical analysis of the land cover and erosion potential in the Reedy Creek basin.
  • The ethics section contains a summary of how other cities incorporate ethics and values into their environmental management procedures, especially with regards to climate change and concludes with the student’s recommendations as to how the city of Richmond could better incorporate residents’ thoughts and values in its decision-making from this point forward.
Though this concerns one proposed project in the Reedy Creek watershed, their analysis and ideas will likely be applicable to other situations that will impact our environment.

You are welcome to attend.

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Reedy Creek and a small tributary, Crooked Branch, flow through Crooked Branch Ravine Park.  This small, passive park is home to many native trees, shrubs, and perennials that could be lost to advancing invasive plant species, particularly English ivy and privet.  Reedy Creek Coalition members are planning to have a workday once each month to remove invasive species.  Our efforts will focus on 1) removing ivy from trees and other plants that are significant sources of seed and 2) monitoring and removing small patches of non-native plants and seedlings from an area that is not yet severely impacted.

  • Please consider joining us on Sunday, April 2 from 1-3 p.m.
  • We will meet at the end of Northrop Street where there is a path into the park.
  • Bring gloves, pruners, and, if you have one, a small saw for cutting large ivy vines.

 

Blackhaw viburnum (Viburnum prunifolium) is leafing out and just starting to set some buds.  This plant is fairly common in this little patch of woods.

 

 

 

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Reedy Creek and a small tributary, Crooked Branch, flow through Crooked Branch Ravine Park.  This small, passive park is home to many native trees, shrubs, and perennials that could be lost to advancing invasive plant species, particularly English ivy and privet.  Reedy Creek Coalition members are planning to have a workday once each month to remove invasive species.  Our efforts will focus on 1) removing ivy from trees and other plants that are significant sources of seed and 2) monitoring and removing small patches of non-native plants and seedlings from an area that is not yet severely impacted.

  • Please consider joining us on Sunday, March 5 from 1-3 p.m.
  • We will meet at the end of Northrop Street where there is a path into the park.
  • Bring gloves, pruners, and, if you have one, a small saw for cutting large ivy vines.

We intend to continue these efforts on a monthly basis and and hope that you will join us.

This lovely little evergreen is easily found in the park, but will not survive as English ivy spreads.  The plant blooms in late spring.  Please help save the native plants of Crooked Branch Ravine.

chimaphila-maculata-spotted-wintergreen-flower-with-ivy

Wintergreen, Chimaphila species

 

 

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Join Friends of Forest Hill Park this coming Saturday….

fhp-ivy-removal

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