Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Native Plant Workshop’ Category

Please join us for…

workshop_flyer

Click here for more information and to register. 

Read Full Post »

We had so many applicants for our Native Plant Workshop that we decided to change the location to allow more people to attend and have re-opened registration (see sidebar to register). The registration deadline is now Tuesday,  September 18, 2012.   The workshop will still be held on September 22, 2012 from  9 AM  to 12 PM.  The location will be Westover Baptist Church, 1000 Westover Hills Blvd. The church is a block south of the intersection of Westover Hills and Forest Hill, at the stoplight with Dunston.  The parking lot is at the corner of Westover Hills and Reedy avenue and the entrance to use will be marked with signs.  

Butterfly and Caterpillar Explosion in Richmond

During the past 2 – 3 weeks we  have had an explosion of butterflies and caterpillars in Richmond!  One of us found 8 Monarch caterpillars  on a Swamp Milkweed plant in her backyard.  This is the way things looked when the caterpillars were discovered:

Before Picture: Monarch Caterpillars on Milkweed

The very next morning this is how things looked:

After Picture: The Milkweed Has Been Skeletonized in One Day!

Fortunately, we had  more milkweed in the yard and were able to transfer the caterpillars to those plants.

Come to our Native Plant Workshop to learn how you, too, can provide host plants for butterflies to lay their eggs on and provide enough of the host plants so the caterpillars won’t starve!

Read Full Post »

What are “host” plants and why are they so important?

Our native insects and native plants evolved together.  During this long period of time they developed special relationships with one another.  In particular, the larval forms of our native insects came to require specific native plants to serve as their food source.  Butterflies are a good example of this.  The caterpillars of the Spicebush Swallowtail butterfly, for instance, utilize the leaves of the spicebush (Lindera benzoin) as their source of food.

Spicebush Swallowtail Butterfly

Now-a-days in our urbanized environment, most of us probably wouldn’t recognize a spicebush if we saw one, let alone connect it to the beautiful, blue-spotted butterfly we may see feeding on nectar at our flowers.  Yet the survival of the Spicebush Swallowtail butterfly depends largely on the availability of spicebush.  Thus spicebush is called a host plant for this butterfly.

Similarly, the caterpillars of the Monarch butterfly have an absolute requirement for plants of the milkweed family or dogbane family (a close relative of milkweeds).  Milkweeds are host plants for the Monarch butterfly.  Years ago milkweeds were everywhere.  Since we humans decided to classify them as “weeds,” they have largely disappeared from our urban environment.  Yet these “weeds” have beautiful flowers that can enhance our urban gardens.

Come to our workshop to learn how YOU can help ensure the survival of butterflies and other insects, on which we are so dependent without even realizing it, by growing their host plants in YOUR garden.

Saturday, September 22 9 a.m. – Noon

Westover Baptist Church – 1000 Westover Blvd.

This workshop is FREE but limited to 60 participants.

Registration is required.

Click here for more information and registration

Thanks to http://bearmountainbutterflies.com/ for permission to use their image of a Spicebush Swallowtail butterfly!

Read Full Post »

Who benefits from the plants in your yard?

Can your plant choices increase biodiversity?

Should your garden have a function – other than to look pretty?

Come to our native plant workshop!

We’ll answer these questions and more, introduce you to some nice natives, and explain why it is so important to…

Saturday, September 22 9 a.m. – Noon

Westover Baptist Church – 1000 Westover Blvd.

This workshop is FREE but limited to 60 participants.

Registration is required.

Click here for more information and registration

Read Full Post »